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Full text of "[Funeral services of Masonic lodges"

BANCROFT 
LIBRARY 



THE LIBRARY 

OF 

THE UNIVERSITY 

OF CALIFORNIA 



Freemasons. California, 

eFtmeral services of Masonic lodges,; 



Digitized by the Internet Arciiive 

in 2008 with funding from 

IVIicrosoft Corporation 



http://www.archive:org/details/funeralservicesoOOfreerich 





FUNERAL SERVICE 



Ho ,F. &A.III. 




Lodge, 



CAL. 




FROM THE OFFICE OF THE MASONIC MONTHLY, 
22 Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 

1878. 



^ 




FUNERAL SERVICE. 



No Mason can he interred with the formalities of the 
Order, unless he shall have been raised to the Third 
Degree, Fellow Crafts and Entered Apprentices are 
not entitled to Masonic obsequies, nor can they join in 
processions on such occasions. 

All brethren in attendance at a funeral should be de- 
cently clothed in black, with crape upon the left arm, 
and with white gloves and aprons. 

The brethren having assembled at the Lodge-room, 
the Master opens the Lodge in the third degree of Ma^ 
sonry, and states the purpose for which it has been 
called together. 

The service is then commenced, as follows : 

Master. "What man is he that liveth and shall 
not see death ? Shall he deliver his soul from the 
hand of the grave? 

Response, Man walketh in a vain shadow; he 
heapeth up riches and cannot tell who shall gather 
them. 

Master. When he dieth he shall carry nothing 
away; his glory shall not descend after him. 

Response, Naked came he into the world, and 
naked must he return. 

Master. The Lord gave, and the Lord hath 
taken away; blessed be the name of the Lord. 







FUNERAL SERVICE. 




Solemn music may here he introduced, after which the 
Mastery taking the sacred roll in his hand, says: 

Let us die the death of the righteous, and let our 
last end be like theirs. 

Besponse. God is our God for ever and ever: He 
will be our guide even unto death. 

The Master then records the name and age of the 
deceased upon the roll, and says : 

Almighty Father! into thy hands we commend 
the soul of our beloved brother. 

Besponse, {Bepeated thrice, giving the Grand 
Honors each time.) The will of God is accom- 
plished! So mote it be! Amen! 

The Master then deposits the roll in the archives, and 
repeats the following prayer: 

Most glorious God ! Author of all good, and 
Giver of all mercy ! Pour down Thy blessing 
upon us, we beseech Thee, and strengthen our sol- 
emn engagements with the ties of sincere affection! 
Endow us with fortitude and resignation in this our 
dark hour of sorrow; and grant that this afflicting 
dispensation from Thy hands may be sanctified in 
its results upon the hearts of those who now meet 
here to mourn! May the present instance of mor- 
tality remind us of our own approaching fate, and 
draw our attention toward Thee, the only refuge in 
time of need; that when the awful moment shall 






rUNEEAL 8EBVICE. 




arrive at which we, too, must quit this transitory 
scene, the enlivening prospect of Thy mercy may 
dispel the gloom of death ; and that, after our de- 
parture hence, in peace and in thy favor, we may be 
received into Thy everlasting kingdom, to enjoy the 
just reward of a virtuous and pious life. Amen! 
Besponse, So mote it be. 

Soletnn music may here again he introduced^ during 
which a procession is formed. If the body be not in 
the Lodge room^ the procession will move to the house 
of the deceased, and thence with his remains to the 
place of sepulture y in the following order: 

The Tyler with a drawn sword; 

Stewards with white Kods; 

Musicians, 

(If Masons; otherwise they will follow the Tyler ;>) 

Master Masons;] 

Junior Deacon; (Holy Writings) Senior Deacon; 

With blue Eods; 

Secretary and Treasurer; 

Junior and Senior Wardens; 

Past Masters; 

The Master; 

The Reverend Clergy ; 

The ^ Body; 

With the insignia ifl placed thereon; 

Pall Bearers; H' Pall Bearers; 

Mourners. 





The Brethren should not leave their places during 
the procession. Upon arriving at the peace of burial ^ 
the members of the Lodge will form a circle around 
the grave; the clergyman and officers of the Lodge will 
proceed to its head, and the mourners will be placed at 
its foot. The services will then be resumed by the Mas- 
tery as follows : 

Once more, my brethren, have we assembled to 
perform the last sad and solemn duties to the dead, 
The mournful notes which betoken the departure 
of a spirit from its earthly tabernacle have again 
alarmed our outer door, and another has been taken 
to swell the numbers in that unknown land whither 
our fathers have gone before us. 

Our brother has reached the end of life. The 
brittle thread which bound him to earth has been 
severed; and the liberated spirit has winged its 
flight to the undiscovered world. The silver cord 
is loosed; the golden bowl is broken; the pitcher is 
broken at the fountain ; and the wheel is broken at 
the cistern. The dust has returned to the earth, 
as it was; and the spirit has returned to the God 
who gave it. 

While we deplore the loss of our beloved brother, 
and pay this fraternal tribute to his memory, let us 
not forget, my brethren, that we, too, are mortal; 
that our bodies, now so strong and vigorous, must 
ere long, like his, become tenants of the narrow 
grave; and that our spirits too, like his, must 





return to the God who spake them into existence. 
" Man that is born of woman is of few days, and 
full of trouble. He cometh forth as a flower and is 
cut down; he fleeth also as a shadow, and con- 
tinueth not.'* The Almighty fiat has gone forth — 
"Dust thou art, and unto dust shalt thou return;*' 
— and that we are all subject to that dread decree, 
the solemn cause of our present meeting, the daily 
observation of our lives, and the mournful mounds 
which indicate this population of the dead, furnish 
evidence not to be forgotten. 

Seeing then, my brethren, that life is so uncer- 
tain, and that all earthly pursuits are vain, let us 
no longer postpone the all-important concern of 
preparing for eternity; but let us embrace the pres- 
ent moment, while time and opportunity are offered, 
to provide against that great change when all the 
pomps and pleasure of this fleeting world will pall 
upon the sense, and the recollection of a virtuous 
and well spent life will yield the only comfort and 
consolation. Thus we shall not be hurried, unpre- 
paired, into the presence of that all-wise and pow- 
erful Judge, to whom the secrets of all hearts are 
known ; and on the great day of reckoning we shall 
be ready to give a good account of our stewardship 
while here on earth. ' 

With becoming reverence, then, let us supplicate 
the Divine Grace to insure the favor of that Eternal 





Being whose goodness and power knows no bounds; 
that, on the arrival of the momentous hour when 
the fading taper of human Hfe shall faintly glimmer 
in the socket of existence, our Faith may remove 
the dark shroud, draw aside the sable curtains of 
the tomb, and bid Hope sustain and cheer the de- 
parting spirit. 

This city of the dead, my brethren, has an over- 
whelming emphasis in its solemn silence. It tells 
us of the gathering, within its embrace, of the pa- 
rents' fondest hopes; of the disseverance of all 
earthly ties to the departed ones who gave us birth ; 
of the darkness into which the bright prospects of 
the loving husband and the devoted wife have sud- 
denly been engulphed; of the unavailing grief of 
the affectionate brother and the tender sister ; of 
the dread sleep of death which here envelopes the 
subjects of many an early, many an instantaneous 
call into eternity, given in the midst of health, of 
gayety, and of brightest hopes. 

And our departed brother, where is he? All that 
remains of him, here on earth, is now inclosed in 
that narrow coffin, a lifeless mass of clay. The 
deep, the agonizing sorrow of those to whom he 
was most near and dear — the scalding tears which 
have been shed upon his last earthly tenement — the 
manly and fraternal grief of his brethren of the 
Mystic tie— are all by him unheeded. His every 





rUNEEAIi SKBVICE. 




faculty has fled ; the purple current which sustained 
his life has ceased to flow; the tongue, which was 
wont to give utterance to the emotions and feelings 
of the heart, performs no more its functions; the 
eyes, which so late reflected the movements of the 
intelligent principle within, are now closed in 
death; — unfitted to remain longer upon earth, we 
lay him reverently beneath its surface. A little, 
narrow spot is all that he now can fill; the clod will 
hide him from our view, and the places which have 
known him here will know him no more forever. 

We consign him to the grave — to the long sleep, 
of death; and so profound will be that sleep that 
the giant thread of the earthquake, even, shall not 
disturb it. There will he slumber until the Arch- 
Angel's trump shall usher in that eventful morn, 
when, by our Supreme Grand Master's word, he 
will be raised to that blissful Lodge which no time 
can remove, and which to those worthy of admis- 
sion will remain open during the boundless ages of 
eternity. In that Heavenly Sanctuary, the Mystic 
Light, unmingled with darkness, will reign un- 
broken and perpetual. There, amid the sun-beam 
smiles of Immutable Love, under the benignant 
bend of the All-seeing Eye, in that temple, not made 
with hands, eternal in the Heavens — there, my 
brethren, may Almighty God, of His infinite mercy, 
grant that we may finally meet, to part no more. 






FUNERAL SEKVIOB. 




The following invocations are then rehearsed by the 
Master f and responded to by the brethren. 

Master, May we be true and faithful, and may 
we live and die in love ! 

Besponse. So mote it be! 

Master. May we profess only that which is good, 
and may we always act in accordance with our pro- 
fessions! 

Response. So mote it be ! 

Master, May the Lord bless and prosper us, 
and may all our good intentions be crowned with 
success ! 

Besponse, So mote it be ! 

Master, Glory be to God in the highest! on earth, 
peace and good will toward men! 

Besponse. So mote it be, now, henceforth, and 
forevermore. Amen! 

The apron is then taken from the coffin and handed 
to the Master ; the coffin is deposited in the grave j and 
the Master continues: 

This Lamb-skin (or white apron) is an emblem of 
Innocence, and the peculiar badge of a Mason. It 
is more ancient than the Golden Fleece or Koman 
Eagle, and, when worthily worn, more honorable 
than Star or Garter, or any other order which earth- 
ly power can confer. This emblem I now deposit 
in the grave of our deceased brother, {Drops it in 




-«^p_ 




rUNEEAL SEBVICE. 




the grave.) By this act we are reminded of the uni- 
versal dominion of Death. The arm of Friendship 
cannot oppose the King of Terrrors; the shield of 
Fraternal Love cannot protect his victim, nor can 
the charms of innocence avert his fatal touch. All, 
all must die. This grave, that coffin, and this cir- 
cle of mourning friends remind us that we too are 
mortal, and that ere long our bodies also shall 
moulder into dust. How important then it is for 
us to know that our Kedeemer liveth, and that He 
shall stand at the latter day upon the earth. 
( Taking the sprig of Acacia in his hand.) 

This Evergreen, which once marked the tempo- 
rary resting place of one illustrious in Masonic his- 
tory, is an emblem of our enduring faith in the im- 
mortality of the soul. By it we are reminded that 
we have an immortal part within us, which shall 
survive the grave, and which will never, never die. 
By it we are admonished that, though like our 
brother, whose remains now lie before us, we too 
shall soon be clothed in the habiliments of death, 
and be deposited in the silent tomb, yet, through 
the loving goodness of our Supreme Grand Mas- 
ter, we may confidently hope that, like this ever- 
green, our souls will hereafter flourish in eternal 
spring. 

[ TJie brethren here move in procession around the 
grave, each depositing therein a sprig of evergreen. 







10 FUNEBAIi SEBVICE. 



The Secretary then drops ike Boll upon the coffin; and 
then the public Grand Honors are given."} 

The ceremony is then continued by the Master, as 
follows: 

From time immemorial it has been the custom 
among the Fraternity of Free and Accepted Ma- 
sons, at the request of a brother, to accompany his 
remains to the place of interment, and there to de- 
posit them with the usual formalities of the Craft. 

In conformity to this usage, and in accordance 
with the duty which we owe to our departed 
brother, whose loss we now most deeply do de- 
plore, we have assembled in the character of Ma- 
sons to offer up to his memory, before the world, 
the last sad tribute of our affection; thereby dem- 
onstrating the sinserity of our past esteem for him, 
and our steady attachment to the principles of our 
beloved Order. 

The Great Creator having been pleased, in His 
infinite wisdom, to remove our brother from the 
cares and troubles of this transitory life, thus sev- 
ering another link in the fraternal chain by which 
we are bound together — let us, who survive him, 
be yet more strongly cemented by the ties of union, 
friendship, and brotherly love ; that, during the 
brief space allotted to us here, we may wisely ancj 
usefully employ our time, and, in the reciprocal 






FUNEEAIi SKKVICE. 




intercourse of kind and friendly acts, mutually pro- 
mote the welfare and happiness of each other. 

Unto the grave we have consigned the body of 
our deceased brother— earth to earth, ashes to ashes, 
dust to dust : — there to remain until the last trump 
shall sound on the resurrection morn. We can 
trustfully leave him in the hands of a beneficent 
Being, who has done all things well; who is glori- 
ous in His holiness, wondrous in His power, and 
boundless in His goodness; and it should only be 
our endeavor so to improve the solemn warning 
now before us that, on the great day of account, we 
too may be found worthy to inherit the Kingdom 
prepared for us from the foundation of the world. 

To the bereaved relatives of him we mourn, who 
now stand heart-stricken by the heavy hand which 
has thus been laid upon them, we have but little of 
this world's consolation to present. We deeply, 
sincerely, and most affectionately sympathize with 
them in this afflicting dispensation ; and we put up 
our most fervent prayers that ' ' He who tempers 
the wind to the shorn lamb " will look down with 
compassion upon the widow and the fatherless, in 
this their hour of desolation, and will fold the be- 
nevolent arms of His love and protection around 
those who are thus bereft of their earthly stay. 

The Master, or Chaplain, will then repeat the follow- 
ing prayer: 





Almighty and Eternal God, in whom we live, and 
move, and have our being, and before whom all 
men must appear at the Judgment-day to render an 
account of their deeds while in this life — we, who 
are daily exposed to the flying shafts of death, and 
who now surround the grave of one who has fallen 
in our midst, do most humbly beseech Thee to im- 
press deeply on our minds the solemnities of this 
day, and to grant that their remembrance may be 
the means of turning our thoughts from the fleet- 
ing vanities of the present world to the lasting glo- 
ries of the world to come. Let us be continually 
reminded of the frail tenure by which we hold our 
earthly existence; that in the midst of life we are 
in death; and that however upright may have been 
our walk, and however square our conduct, we must 
all submit as victims to the great destroyer, and 
endure the humble level of the tomb. Grant us Thy 
divine assistance, O most merciful God, to redeem 
our mis-spent time; and in the discharge of the im- 
portant duties which thou hast assigned us in the 
erection of our moral edifice, wilt Thou give us 
wisdom to direct us, strength to support us, and the 
beauty of holiness to adorn our labors and render 
them acceptable in Thy sight. And when our work 
on earth is done, and our bodies shall go down to 
mingle with their kindred dust, may our immortal 
souls, freed from their cumbrous clay, be received 




FUNEKAL SEBVICE. 




into Thy keeping, to rest forever in that spiritual 
house, not made with hands, eternal in the heavens. 
Amen! 

Response, So mote it be ! 

The Master then approaches the head of the grave 
and says: 

Soft and safe to you, my brother, be this earthy 
bed ! Bright and glorious be thy rising from it ! 
Fragrant be the cassia sprig that here shall flourish! 
May the earliest buds of Spring unfold their beau- 
ties o'er this your resting place, and here may the 
sweetness of the Summer's last rose linger longest! 
Though the cold blasts of Autumn may lay them in 
the dust, and for a time destroy the loveliness of 
their existence, yet the destruction is not final, and 
in the Spring they shall surely bloom again. So, 
in the bright morning of the world's resurrection, 
your mortal frame, now laid in the dust by the 
chilling blast of Death, shall spring again into 
newness of life, and expand in immortal beauty, in 
realms beyond the skies. Until then, dear brother, 
until then, farewell! 

(Benediction.) The Lord bless us and keep us — 
the Lord make His face to shine upon us, and be 
gracious unto us — the Lord lift upon us the light of 
His countenance and give us peace. 

Response, Amen! So mote it be. 




Thus the services end. The procession will re-form 
and return to the Lodge-Boom^ and the Lodge will be 
closed in the customary manner, 

7he public Grand Honors of Masonry are given 
thus: — Gross the arms upon the breast, the left arm 
outermost, the hands being open and palms inward ; 
then raise them above the head, the palms of the hands 
striking each other; and then let them fall sharply upon 
the thighs, the head being bowed. This will be thrice 
done, and, at funerals, the action will be accompanied 
with the following ejaculation: — '* The will of God is 
accomplished. So mote it be. Amen.** 




'<:f^^ 






FUNERAL DIRGE. 



• Air—" Pleyel's German Hymn/* 

1. Solemn strikes the fun'ral chime, 
Notes of our departing time; 
As we journey here below, 
Through a pilgrimage of woe. 

2. Mortals now indulge a tear, 
For mortality is here ; 
See how wide their trophies wave 
O'er the slumbers of the grave. 

3. Here another Guest we bring ! 
Seraphs of celestial wing, 
To our fun'ral altar come; 
Waft a Friend and Brother home 

4. Far beyond the grave there lie 
Brighter mansions in the sky; 
"Where, enthroned, the Deity 
Gives man immortality. 

6. There, enlarged, his soul will see 
"What was veiled in mystery; 
Heavenly glories of the place 
Show his Maker " face to face.'* 

6. God of life's Eternal Day ! 

Guide us, lest from Thee we stray, 
By a false, delusive light, 
To the shades of endless night. 

»7, Calm, the Good Man meets his fate ; 
Guards celestial round him wait. 
See, he bursts those mortal chains, 
And o'er Death the vict'ry gains! 

8. Lord of all below, above. 

Fill our souls with truth nnd Love; 
As dissolves our earthly tio, 
Take us to Thy Lodge on High I 

Note.— It is customary to sing only the 1st, 3d and 8th 
stanzas. On funeral occasions the first two of these may be 
sung on entering the burial-ground, while moving in pro- 
cession; and the last during the ceremonies at the grave. 





A CL OSING HYMN. 

Air — "Home, Sweet Home." 

Farewell, till again we shall welcome the time. 
Which brings us once more to our lame-cherished shrine; 
And tho' from each other we distant may roam, 
Again may all meet in this, our dear love'd home; 

Home, home — sweet, sweet home ; 
May ev'ry dear brother find joy and peace at home. 

And when our last parting on earth shall draw nigh. 
And we shall be called to the Grand Lodge on high. 
May each be prepared when the summons shall come 
To meet the Grand Master in Heaven our home ; 

Home, home— sweet, sweet home; 
May ev'ry dear brother in Heaven find a home. 



ODE FOR T HE THIR D DEGREE. 

Air — '• Pleyel's German Hymn.'* 

1. Ah I when shall we three meet like them 
Who last were at Jerusalem ? 

For three there were, and oue is not — 
He lies where Cassia marks the spot. 

2. Tho' poor he was, with kings he trod; 
Tho' great, he humbly knelt to God. 
Ah! when shall those restore again 

The broken links of Friendship's chain? 

3. Behold! where mourning Beauty bent 
In silence o'er his mouumeut 

And wildly spread in sorrow there 
The ringlets of the flowing hair 1 

i. The future sons of grief shall sigh, 
While standing round in Mystic Tie, 
And raise their hands, alas! to Heaven, 
In anguish that no hope is given. 

5. From whence we came, or whither go. 
Ask me no more, nor seek to know. 
Till three shall meet, who form'd like them. 
The Grand Lodge of Jerusalem. 





I 






iUJi 



kl^^' 






Y\3i^KRAL Service 



p,?s 






Occidental Lodge, No. 22 



F, ..» A, M 



SAN FRANCISCO: 

Jos. WiNTERBITRN & CO. PRINTERS, NO. 417 CLAY STREET, 

1883. 



i3 



i 



'i ^.n^.^tFt^'^i^-^'^'^^t^jrjr^^^^j^j ^ ^^t^tr^ A ^m 



m 



^ 








FUNERAL SERVICE. 



No Mason can he interred with the formalities of the 
Order^ unless he shall have been raised to the Third 
Degree, Fellow Crafts and Entered Apprentices are 
not entitled to Masonic obsequies, nor can they join in 
processions on such occasions. 

All brethren in attendance at a funeral should be de- 
cently cloJied in black, with crape upon the left arm, 
and with white gloves and aprons. 

The brethren having assembled at the Lodge-room, 
the blaster opens the Lodge in the third degree of Ma- 
sonry, and states the purpose for which it has been 
called together. 

The service is then commenced, as follows : 

Master. What man is he that liveth and shall 
not see death ? Shall he deliver his soul from the 
hand of the grave? 

Besponse, Man walketh in a vain shadow; he 
heapeth np riches and cannot tell who shall gather 
them. 

Master. When he dieth he shall carry nothing 
away; his glory shall not descend after him. 

Response. Naked came he into the world, and 
naked must he return. 

Master, The Lord gave, and the Lord hath 
taken away; blessed be the name of the Lord. 






rUNEEAL SEEVICE. 




Solemn music may here he introduced y after which the 
Master, taking the sacked boll in his hand, says: 

Let Tis die the death of the righteous, and let our 
last end be like theirs. 

Response. God is our God for ever and ever: He 
will be our guide even unto death. 

The Master then records the name and age of the 
deceased upon the roll, and says : 

Almighty Father! into thy hands we commend 
the soul of our beloved brother. 

Response, {Repeated thrice, giving the Grand 
Honors each time.) The will of God is accom- 
plished! So mote it be! Amen! 

The Master then deposits the roll in the archives, and 
repeats the following prayer: 

Most glorious God ! Author of all good, and 
Giver of all mercy ! Pour down Thy blessing 
upon us, we beseech Thee, and strengthen our sol- 
emn engagements with the ties of sincere affection ! 
Endow us with fortitude and resignation in this our 
dark hour of sorrow; and grant that this af9.icting 
dispensation from Thy hands may be sanctified in 
its results upon the hearts of those who now meet 
here to mourn! May the present instance of mor- 
tality remind us of our own approaching fate, and 
draw our attention toward Thee, the only refuge in 
time of need; that when the awful moment shall 





rtJNEEAL SEEVICE. 




arrive at which we, too, must quit this transitory 
scene, the enlivening prospect of Thy mercy may 
dispel the gloom of death ; and that, after our de- 
parture hence, in peace and in thy favor, we may be 
received into Thy everlasting kingdom, to enjoy the 
just reward of a virtuous and pious life. Amen! 
Besponse, So mote it be. 

Soletnn music may here again be introduced^ during 
which a procession is formed. If the body be not in 
the Lodge room, the procession will move to the house 
of the deceased^ and thence with his remains to the 
place of sepulture^ in the following order: 

The Tyler with a drawn sword; 

Stewards with white Eods; 

Musicians, 

(TFMasons; otherwise they will follow the Tyler ;>) 

Master Masons;] 
Junior Deacon; (Holy Writings) Senior Deacon; 
^^ With blue Kods; 

^K- Secretary and Treasurer; 

^^^K^ Junior and Senior Wardens; 
^^^^B Fast Masters; 

^^^K The Master; 

^Hj^P The Eeverend Clergy; 

R^ The m Body; 

^^ With the insignia iH placed thereon; 
Pall Bearers; ||( Pall Bearers; 
Mourners. 






FUNEBAIj sekyice. 




The Brethren should not leave their places during 
the procession. Upon arriving at the piace of hurial, 
the members of the Lodge will form a circle around 
the grave; the clergyman and officers of the Lodge will 
proceed to its head, and the mourners will he placed at 
its foot. The services will then he resumed hy the Mas- 
ter, as follows : 

Once more, my brethren, have we assembled to 
perform the last sad and solemn duties to the dead, 
The mournful notes which betoken the departure 
of a spirit from its earthly tabernacle have again 
alarmed our outer door, and another has been taken 
to swell the numbers in that unknown land whither 
our fathers have gone before us. 

Our brother has reached the end of life. The 
brittle thread which bound him to earth has been 
severed; and the liberated spirit has winged its 
flight to the undiscovered world. The silver cord 
is loosed; the golden bowl is broken; the pitcher is 
broken at the fountain; and the wheel is broken at 
the cistern. The dust has returned to the earth, 
as it was; and the spirit has returned to the God 
who gave it. 

While we deplore the loss of our beloved brother, 
and pay this fraternal tribute to his memory, let us 
not forget, my brethren, that we, too, are mortal; 
that our bodies, now so strong and vigorous, must 
ere long, like his, become tenants of the narrow 
grave; and that our spirits too, like his, must 






FUNERAL SEEVICE. 




return to the God who spake them into existence. 
** Man that is born of woman is of few days, and 
full of trouble. He cometh forth as a flower and is 
cut down; he fleeth also as a shadow, and con- 
tinueth not." The Almighty Hat has gone forth — 
"Dust thou art, and unto dust shalt thou return;" 
— and that we are all subject to that dread decree, 
the solemn cause of our present meeting, the daily 
observation of our lives, and the mournful mounds 
which indicate this population of the dead, furnish 
evidence not to be forgotten. 

Seeing then, my brethren, that life is so uncer- 
tain, and that all earthly pursuits are vain, let us 
no longer postpone the all-important concern of 
preparing for eternity; but let us embrace the pres- 
ent moment, while time and opportunity are offered, 
to provide against that great change when all the 
pomps and pleasure of this fleeting world will pall 
upon the sense, and the recollection of a virtuous 
and well spent life will yield the only comfort and 
consolation. Thus we shall not be hurried, unpre- 
paired, into the presence of that all-wise and pow- 
erful Judge, to whom the secrets of all hearts are 
known; and on the great day of reckoning we shall 
be ready to give a good account of our stewardship 
while here on earth. 

With becoming reverence, then, let us supplicate 
the Divine Grace to insure the favor of that Eternal 







6 rUNEBAL SEKVICE, 



Being whose goodness and power knows no bounds; 
that, on the arrival of the momentous hour when 
the fading taper of human life shall faintly glimmer 
in the socket of existence, our Faith may remove 
the dark shroud, draw aside the sable curtains of 
the tomb, and bid Hope sustain and cheer the de- 
parting spirit. 

This city of the dead, my brethren, has an over- 
whelming emphasis in its solemn silence. It tells 
us of the gathering, within its embrace, of the pa- 
rents* fondest hopes; of the disseverance of all 
earthly ties to the departed ones who gave us birth ; 
of the darkness into which the bright prospects of 
the loving husband and the devoted wife have sud- 
denly been engulphed; of the unavailing grief of 
the affectionate brother and the tender sister ; of 
the dread sleep of death which here envelopes the 
subjects of many an early, many an instantaneous 
call into eternity, given in the midst of health, of 
gayety, and of brightest hopes. 

And our departed brother, where is he? All that 
remains of him, here on earth, is now inclosed in 
that narrow coffin, a lifeless mass of clay. The 
deep, the agonizing sorrow of those to whom he 
was most near and dear — the scalding tears which 
have been shed upon his last earthly tenement — the 
manly and fraternal grief of his brethren of the 
Mystic tie — are all by him unheeded. His every 






rUKEBAIi SEEYICE. 




faculty has fled; the purple current which sustained 
his life has ceased to flow; the tongue, which was 
wont to give utterance to the emotions and feelings 
of the heart, performs no more its functions; the 
eyes, which so late reflected the movements of the 
intelligent principle within, are now closed in 
death; — unfitted to remain longer upon earth, we 
lay him reverently beneath its surface. A little, 
narrow spot is all that he now can fill; the clod will 
hide him from our view, and the places which have 
known him here will know him no more forever. 

We consign him to the grave — to the long sleep, 
of death ; and so profound will be that sleep that 
the giant thread of the earthquake, even, shall not 
disturb it. There will he slumber until the Arch- 
Angel's trump shall usher in that eventful morn, 
when, by our Supreme Grand Master's word, he 
will be raised to that blissful Lodge which no time 
can remove, and which to those worthy of admis- 
sion will remain open during the boundless ages of 
eternity. In that Heavenly Sanctuary, the Mystic 
Light, unmingled with darkness, will reign un- 
broken and perpetual. There, amid the sun-beam 
smiles of Immutable Love, under the benignant 
bend of the All-seeing Eye, in that temple, not made 
with hands, eternal in the Heavens — there, my 
brethren, may Almighty God, of His infinite mercy, 
grant that we may finally meet, to part no more. 






rUNEBAL SEKVICE. 




The following invocations are then rehearsed by the 
Master^ and responded to by the brethren. 

Master. May we be true and faithful, and may 
we live and die in love ! 

Response, So mote it be ! ^ 

Master. May we profess only that which is good, 
and may we always act in accordance with our pro- 
fessions ! 

Eesponse, So mote it be! 

Master. May the Lord bless and prosper us, 
and may all our good intentions be crowned with 
success ! 

Eesponse, So mote it be! 

Master, Glory be to God in the highest ! on earth, 
peace and good will toward men! 

Eesponse. So mote it be, now, henceforth, and 
forevermore. Amen! 

The apron is then taken from the coffin and handed 
to the Master ; the coffin is deposited in the grave^' and 
the Master continues: 

This Lamb-skin (or white apron) is an emblem of 
Innocence, and the peculiar badge of a Mason. It 
is more ancient than the Golden Fleece or Eoman 
Eagle, and, when worthily worn, more honorable 
than Star or Garter, or any other order which earth- 
ly power can confer. This emblem I now deposit 
in the grave of our deceased brother. {Drops it in 





FUNEEAL SEEVICB, 




the grave.) By this act we are reminded of the uni- 
versal dominion of Death. The arm of Friendship 
cannot oppose the King of Terrrors; the shield of 
Fraternal Love cannot protect his victim, nor can 
the charms of innocence avert his fatal touch. All, 
all must die. This grave, that coffin, and this cir- 
cle of mourning friends remind us that we too are 
mortal, and that ere long our bodies also shall 
moulder into dust. How important then it is for 
us to know that our Redeemer liveth, and that He 
shall stand at the latter day upon the earth. 
( Taking the sprig of Acacia in his hand.) 

This Evergreen, which once marked the tempo- 
rary resting place of one illustrious in Masonic his- 
tory, is an emblem of our enduring faith in the im- 
mortality of the soul. By it we are reminded that 
we have an immortal part within us, which shall 
survive the grave, and which will never, never die. 
By it we are admonished that, though like our 
brother, whose remains now lie before us, we too 
shall soon be clothed in the habiliments of death, 
and be deposited in the silent tomb, yet, through 
the loving goodness of our Supreme Grand Mas- 
ter, we may confidently hope that, like this ever- 
green, our souls will hereafter flourish in eternal 
spring. 

[ Tlie brethren here move in procession around the 
grave, each depositing therein a sprig of evergreen. 







10 FUNERAL SEEVICE. 



The Secretary then drops the Boll upon the coffin; and 
then the public Grand Honors are given. ] 

The ceremony is then continued by the Master, as 
follows: 

From time immemorial it has been the custom 
among the Fraternity of Free and Accepted Ma- 
sons, at the request of a brother, to accompany his 
remains to the place of interment, and there to de- 
posit them with the usual formalities of the Craft. 

In conformity to this usage, and in accordance 
with the duty which we owe to our departed 
brother, whose loss we now most deeply do de- 
plore, we have assembled in the character of Ma- 
sons to offer up to his memory, before the world, 
the last sad tribute of our affection; thereby dem- 
onstrating the sinoerity of our past esteem for him, 
and our steady attachment to the principles of our 
beloved Order. 

The Great Creator having been pleased, in His 
infinite wisdom, to remove our brother from the 
cares and troubles of this transitory life, thus sev- 
ering another link in the fraternal chain by which 
we are bound together — let us, who survive him, 
be yet more strongly cemented by the ties of union, 
friendship, and brotherly love ; that, during the 
brief space allotted to us here, we may wisely and 
usefully employ our time, and, in the reciprocal 






FUNERAL SKEVICE. 




intercourse of kind and friendly acts, mutually pro- 
mote the welfare and happiness of each other. 

Unto the grave we have consigned the body of 
our deceased brother— earth to earth, ashes to ashes, 
dust to dust : — there to remain until the last trump 
shall sound on the resurrection morn. We can 
trustfully leave him in the hands of a beneficent 
Being, who has done all things well ; who is glori- 
ous in His holiness, wondrous in His pow^er, and 
boundless in His goodness; and it should only be 
our endeavor so to improve the solemn warning 
now before us that, on the great day of account, we 
too may be found worthy to inherit the Kingdom 
prepared for us from the foundation of the world. 

To the bereaved relatives of him we mourn, who 
now stand heart-stricken by the heavy hand which 
has thus been laid upon them, we have but little of 
this world's consolation to present. We deeply, 
sincerely, and most affectionately sympathize with 
them in this afflicting dispensation ; and we put up 
our most fervent prayers that " He who tempers 
the wind to the shorn lamb '* will look down with 
compassion upon the widow and the fatherless, in 
this their hour of desolation, and will fold the be- 
nevolent arms of His love and protection around 
those who are thus bereft of their earthly stay. 

The Master^ or Chaplain^ will then repeat the follow- 
ing prayer: 






12 FUNEBAL SEBVICE. 



Almighty and Eternal God, in whom we live, and 
move, and have our being, and before whom all 
men must appear at the Judgment-day to render an 
account of their deeds while in this life — we, who 
are daily exposed to the flying shafts of death, and 
who now surround the grave of one who has fallen 
in our midst, do most humbly beseech Thee to im- 
press deeply on our minds the solemnities of this 
day, and to grant that their remembrance may be 
the means of turning our thoughts from the fleet- 
ing vanities of the present world to the lasting glo- 
ries of the world to come. Let us be continually 
reminded of the frail tenure by which we hold our 
earthly existence; that in the midst of life we are 
in death; and that however upright may have been 
our walk, and however square our conduct, we must 
all submit as victims to the great destroyer, and 
endure the humble level of the tomb. Grant us Thy 
divine assistance, O most merciful God, to redeem 
our mis-spent time; and in the discharge of the im- 
portant duties which thou hast assigned us in the 
erection of our moral edifice, wilt Thou give us 
wisdom to direct us, strength to support us, and the 
beauty of holiness to adorn our labors and render 
them acceptable in Thy sight. And when our work 
on earth is done, and our bodies shall go down to 
mingle with their kindred dust, may our immortal 
souls, freed from their cumbrous clay, be received 




FUNERAL SEE VICE. 




into Thy keeping, to rest forever in that spiritual 
house, not made with hands, eternal in the heavens. 
Amen! 
Response, So mote it be ! 

The Master then approaches the head of the grave 
and says: 

Soft and safe to you, my brother, be this earthy 
bed ! Bright and glorious be thy rising from it! 
Fragrant be the cassia sprig that here shall flourish ! 
May the earliest buds of Spring unfold their beau- 
ties o'er this your resting place, and here may the 
sweetness of the Summer's last rose linger longest! 
Though the cold blasts of Autumn may lay them in 
the dust, and for a time destroy the loveliness of 
their existence, yet the destruction is not final, and 
in the Spring they shall surely bloom again. So, 
in the bright morning of the world's resurrection, 
your mortal frame, now laid in the dust by the 
chilling blast of Death, shall spring again into 
newness of life, and expand in immortal beauty, in 
realms beyond the skies. Until then, dear brother, 
until then, farewell! 

{Benediction.) The Lord bless us and keep us — 
the Lord make His face to shine upon us, and be 
gracious unto us — the Lord lift upon us the light of 
His countenance and give us peace. 

Response, Amen ! So mote it be. 






14 



rUNEEAL SEBVIOE, 




Thus the services end. The procession will re-form 
and return to the Lodge-Boom^ and the Lodge will he 
closed in the customary manner, 

Ihe public Grand Honors of Masonry are given 
thus: — Cross the arms upon the breast, the left arm 
outermost, the hands being open and palms inward ; 
then raise them above the head, the palms of the hands 
strildng each other ; andi then let them fall sharply upon 
the thighs, the head being bowed. This will be thrice 
done, and, at funerals, the action will be accompanied 
with the following ejaculation:' — ** The will of God is 
accomplished. So mote it be. Amen,** 




tt_ 






FUNERAL . DIRGE, 



Air — "Pleyel's German Hymn." 

1. Solemn strikes the fiin'ral chime, 
Notes of our departing time; 
As we journey here below, 
Through a pilgrimage of woe. 

2. Mortals now indulge a tear. 
For mortality is here ; 
See how wide their trophies wave 
O'er the slumbers of the grave. 

3. Here another Guest we bring ! 
Seraphs of celestial wing, 
To our fun'ral altar come; 
Waft a Friend and Brother home 

4. Far beyond the grave there lie 
Brighter mansions in the sky; 
"Where, enthroned, the Deity 
Gives man immortality. 

5. There, enlarged, his soul will see 
What was veiled in mystery ; 
Heavenly glories of the place 
Show his Maker •• face to face." 

6. God of life's Eternal Day ! 
Guide us, lest from Thee we stray, 
By a false, delusive light. 
To the shades of endless night. 

7. Calm, the Good Man meets his fate; 
Guards celestial round him wait. 
See, he bursts those mortal chains, 
And o'er Death the vict'ry gains i 

8. Lord of all below, above, 
Fill our souls with truth and Love; 
As dissolves our earthly tie, 
Take us to Thy Lodge on High! 

Note. — It is customary to sing only the 1st, 3d and 8th 
stanzas. On funeral occasions the first two of these may be 
sung on entering the burial-ground, while moving in pro- 
cession; and the last during the ceremonies at the grave. 






A CL OSING HYMN". 

Air — "Home, Sweet Home." 

Farewell, till again we shall welcome the time.. 
"Which brings us once more to our lame-cherished shrine; 
And tho' from each other we distant may roam, 
Again may all meet in this, our dear love'd home; 

Home, home — sweet, sweet home ; 
May ev'ry dear brother find joy and peace at home. 

And when our last parting on earth shall draw nigh. 
And we shall be called to the Grand Lodge on high. 
May each be prepared when the summons shall come 
To meet the Grand Master in Heaven our home ; 

Home, home— sweet, sweet home^ 
May ev'ry dear brother in Heaven find a home. 



ODE FOR THE THIRD DEGREE. 



AiE— ** Pleyel's German Hymn.*' 

Ah! when shall we three meet like them 
Who last were at Jerusalem ? 
For three there were, and one is not — 
He lies where Cassia marks the spot. 

Tho' poor he was, with kings he trod; 
Tho' great, he humbly knelt to God. 
Ah! when shall those restore again 
The broken links of Friendship's chain ? 

Behold! where mourning Beauty bent 
In silence o'er his monument 
And wildly spread in sorrow there 
The ringlets of the flowing hair 1 

The future sons of grief shall sigh. 
While standing round in Mystic Tie, 
And raise their hands, alas! to Heaven, 
In anguish that no hope is given. 

From whence we came, or whither go. 
Ask me no more, nor seek to know, 
Till three shall meet, who form'd like them. 
The Grand Lodge of Jerusalem. 





j4 , 



FUNERAL SERVKJE 



IIFK 



No. 136, F, & A. M. 



s^:n^ f FLA^isi a is CO. 



SAN FllANCISCO: 

Jos. WiNTEKBURN & CO., PRINTERS AKD ELECTROTYPERS, 

No. 417 Clay Street, bet. Sansoiue and Battery. 

1878. 





FUNERAL SERVICE. 




No Mason can he interred with the formalities of the 
Order, unless he shall have been raised to the Tliird 
Degree. Fellow Crafts and Entered Apprentices are 
not entitled to Masonic obsequies, nor can they join in 
processions on such occasions. 

All brethren in attendance at a funeral should be de- 
cently clothed in black, loith crape upon the left arm, 
and with white gloves and aprons. 

The brethren having assembled at the Lodge-room, 
the Master opens the Lodge in the third degree of Ma- 
sonry, and states the purpose for which it has been 
called together. 

The service is then commenced, as follows : 

Master. "What man is he that liveth and shall 
not see death ? Shall he deliver his soul from the 
hand of the grave? ^^ 

Response. Man walketh in a vain shadow; he 
heapeth up riches and cannot tell who shall gather 
them. 

Master. When he dieth he shall carry nothing 
away; his glory shall not descend after him. 

Response. Naked came he into the world, and 
naked must he return. 

Master. The Lord gave, and the Lord hath 
taken away; blessed be the name of the Lord. 





Solemn music may here he introduced ^ after which the 
Master y taking the saceed boll in his hand, says: 

Let us die the death of the righteous, and let our 
last end be like theirs. 

Besponse. God is our God for ever and ever: ^e 
will be our guide even unto death. 

TTie Master then records the name and age of the 
deceased upon the roll, and says : 

Almighty Father! into thy hands we commend 
the soul of our beloved brother. 

Response. {Repeated thrice, giving the Grand 
Honors each time.) The will of God is accom- 
plished! So mote it be! Amen! 

The Master then deposits the roll in the archives, and 
repeats the following prayer : 

Most glorious God ! Author of all good, and 
Giver of all mercy ! Pour down Thy blessing 
upon us, we beseech Thee, and strengthen our sol- 
emn engagements with the ties of sincere affection ! 
Endow us with fortitude and resignation in this our 
dark hour of sorrow; and grant that this afflicting 
dispensation from Thy hands may be sanctified in 
its results upon the hearts of those who now meet 
here to mourn! May the present instance of mor- 
tality remind us of our own approaching fate, and 
draw our attention toward Thee, the only refuge in 
time of need; that when the awful moment shall 





rUNEBAL SEEVICE. 




arrive at which we, too, must quit this transitory 
scene, the enlivening prospect of Thy mercy may 
dispel the gloom of death ; and that, after our de- 
parture hence, in peace and in thy favor, we may be 
received into Thy everlasting kingdom, to enjoy the 
just reward of a virtuous and pious life. Amen! 
Besponse, So mote it be. 

Solemn music may here again he introduced, during 
which a procession is formed. If the body he not in 
the Lodge room, the procession will move to the house 
of the deceased, and thence with his remains to the 
place of sepulture, in the following order: 

The Tyler with a drawn sword ; 

Stewards with white Eods; 

Musicians, 

(If Masons; otherwise they will follow the Tyler J) 

Master Masons;] 
Junior Deacon; (Holy Writings) Senior Deacon; 

f With blue Rods; 

Secretary and Treasurer; 
U Junior and Senior Wardens; 
I Past Masters; 

The Master; 
The Reverend Clergy; 
The m Body; 

With the insignia wM placed thereon; 
Pall Bearers; ||f Pall Bearers; 



Mourners. 





The Brethren should not leave their places during 
the procession. Upon arriving at the peace of burial, 
the members of the Lodge loiil form a circle around 
the grave; the clergyman and officers of the Lodge will 
proceed to its head, and the mourners will be placed at 
its foot. The services will then be resumed by the Mas- 
tery as follows : 

Once more, my brethren, have we assembled to 
perform the last sad and solemn duties to the dead, 
The mournful notes which betoken the departure 
of a spirit from its earthly tabernacle have again 
alarmed our outer door, and another has been taken 
to swell the numbers in that unknown land whither 
our fathers have gone before us. 

Our brother has reached the end of life. The 
brittle thread which bound him to earth has been 
severed; and the liberated spirit has winged its 
flight to the undiscovered world. The silver cord 
is loosed; the golden bowl is broken; the pitcher is 
broken at the fountain ; and the wheel is broken at 
the cistern. The dust has returned to the earth, 
as it was; and the spirit has returned to the God 
who gave it. 

While we deplore the loss of our beloved brother, 
and pay this fraternal tribute to his memory, let us 
not forget, my brethren, that we, too, are mortal; 
that our bodies, now so strong and vigorous, must 
ere long, like his, become tenants of the narrow 
grave; and that our spirits too, like his, must 






FUNERAL SERVICE. 




return to the God who spake them into existence. 
"Man that is born of woman is of few days, and 
full of trouble. He cometh forth as a flower and is 
cut down; he fleeth also as a shadow, and con- 
tinueth not." The Almighty Hat has gone forth — 
"Dust thou art, and unto dust shalt thou return;" 
—and that we are all subject to that dread decree, 
the solemn cause of our present meeting, the daily 
observation of our lives, and the mournful mounds 
which indicate this population of the dead, furnish 
evidence not to be forgotten. 

Seeing then, my brethren, that life is so uncer- 
tain, and that all earthly pursuits are vain, let us 
no longer postpone the all-important concern of 
preparing for eternity; but let us embrace the pres- 
ent moment, while time and opportunity are offered, 
to provide against that great change when all the 
pomps and pleasure of this fleeting world will pall 
upon the sense, and the recollection of a virtuous 
and well spent life will yield the only comfort and 
consolation. Thus we shall not be hurried, unpre- 
paired, into the presence of that all-wise and pow- 
erful Judge, to whom the secrets of all hearts are 
known ; and on the great day of reckoning we shall 
be ready to give a good account of our stewardship 
while here on earth. '' 

With becoming reverence, then, let us supplicate 
the Divine Grace to insure the favor of that Eternal 






rUNEEAL SEKVICE. 



Being whose goodness and power knows no bounds; 
that, on the arrival of the momentous hour when 
the fading taper of human life shall faintly glimmer 
in the socket of existence, our Faith may remove 
the dark shroud, draw aside the sable curtains of 
the tomb, and bid Hope sustain and cheer the de- 
parting spirit. 

This city of the dead, my brethren, has an over- 
whelming emphasis in its solemn silence. It tells 
us of the gathering, within its embrace, of the pa- 
rents' fondest hopes; of the disseverance of all 
earthly ties to the departed ones who gave us birth; 
of the darkness into which the bright prospects of 
the loving husband and the devoted wife have sud- 
denly been engulphed; of the unavailing grief of 
the affectionate brother and the tender sister ; of 
the dread sleep of death which here envelopes the 
subjects of many an early, many an instantaneous 
call into eternity, given in the midst of health, of 
gayety, and of brightest hopes. 

And our departed brother, where is he? All that 
remains of him, here on earth, is now inclosed in 
that narrow coffin, a lifeless mass of clay. The 
deep, the agonizing sorrow of those to whom he 
was most near and dear — the scalding tears which 
have been shed upon his last earthly tenement — the 
manly and fraternal grief of his brethren of the 
Mystic tie — are all by him unheeded. His every 








FUKEEAL SEEYICE. 




II 



faculty has fled; the purple current wliich sustained 
his life has ceased to flow; the tongue, which was 
wont to give utterance to the emotions and feelings 
of the heart, performs no more its functions; the 
eyes, which so late reflect^ the movements of the 
intelligent principle within, are now closed in 
death; — unfitted to remain longer upon earth, we 
lay him reverently beneath its surface. A little, 
narrow spot is all that he now can fill; the clod will 
bide him from our view, and the places which have 
'known him here will know him no more forever. 

We consign him to the grave — to the long sleep 
of death; and so profound will be that sleep that 
the giant thread of the earthquake, even, shall not 
disturb it. There will he slumber until the Arch- 
Angel's trump shall usher in that eventful morn, 
when, by our Supreme Grand Master's word, he 
will be raised to that blissful Lodge which no time 
can remove, and which to those worthy of admis- 
sion will remain open during the boundless ages of 
eternity. In that Heavenly Sanctuary, the Mystic 
Light, unmingled with darkness, will reign un- 
broken and perpetual. There, amid the sun-beam 
smiles of Immutable Love, under the benignant 
bend of the All-seeing Eye, in that temple, not made 
with hands, eternal in the Heavens — there, my 
brethren, may Almighty God, of His infinite mercy, 
grant that we may finally meet, to part no more. 






FUNEBAL SEBVICE. 




The following invocations are then rehearsed by the 
Master^ and responded to by the brethren. 

Master. May we be true and faithful, and may 
we live and die in love ! 

Response. So mote it^e ! 

Master. May we profess only that which is good, 
and may we always act in accordance with our pro- 
fessions ! 

Response. So mote it be! 

Master. May the Lord bless and prosper us, 
and may all our good intentions be crowned with 
success! 

Response. So mote it be! 

Master. Glory be to God in the highest ! on earth, 
peace and good will toward men ! 

Response. So mote it be, now, henceforth, and 
forevermore. Amen ! 

The apron is then taken from the coffin and handed 
to the Piaster ; the coffin is deposited in the grave; and 
the Master continues: 

This Lamb-skin (or white apron) is an emblem of 
Innocence, and the peculiar badge of a Mason. It 
is more ancient than the Golden Fleece or Roman 
Eagle, and, when worthily worn, more honorable 
than Star or Garter, or any other order which earth- 
ly power can confer. This emblem I now deposit 
in the grave of our deceased brother. {Drops it in 






rUNEEAL SEEVICE. 




the grave.) By this act we are reminded of the uni- 
versal dominion of Death. The arm of Friendship' 
cannot oppose the King of Terrrors; the shield of 
Fraternal Love cannot protect his victim, nor can 
the charms of innocence avert his fatal touch. All, 
all must die. This grave, that coffin, and this cir- 
cle of mourning friends remind us that we too are 
mortal, and that ere long our bodies also shall 
moulder into dust. How important then it is for 
us to know that our Redeemer liveth, and that He 
shall stand at the latter day upon the earth. 
I ( Taking the sprig of Acacia in his hand.) 

" This Evergreen, which once marked the tempo- 
rary resting place of one illustrious in Masonic his- 
tory, is an emblem of our enduring faith in the im- 
mortality of the soul. By it we are reminded that 
we have an immortal part within us, which shall 
survive the grave, and which will never, never die. 
By it we are admonished that, though like our 
brother, whose remains now lie before us, we too 
shall soon be clothed in the habiliments of death, 
and be deposited in the silent tomb, yet, through 
the loving goodness of our Supreme Grand Mas- 
ter, we may confidently hope that, like this ever- 
green, our souls will hereafter flourish in eternal 
spring. 

[ The brethren here move in procession around the 
grave^ each depositing therein a sprig of evergreen. 






FUNERAL SERVICE. 




The Secretary then drops the Boll upon the coffin; and 
then the public Grand Honors are given. ] 

The ceremony is then continued by the Master, as 
follows: 

From time immemorial it has been the custom 
among the Fraternity of Free and . Accepted Ma- 
sons, at the request of a brother, to accompany his 
remains to the place of interment, and there to de- 
posit them with the usual formalities of the Craft. 

In conformity to this usage, and in accordance 
with the duty which we owe to our departed 
brother, whose loss we now most deeply do de- 
plore, we have assembled in the character of Ma- 
sons to ofifer up to his memory, before the world, 
the last sad tribute of our affection; thereby dem- 
onstrating the sinserity of our past esteem for him, 
and our steady attachment to the principles of our 
beloved Order. 

The Great Creator having been pleased, in His 
infinite wisdom, to remove our brother from the 
cares and troubles of this transitory life, thus sev- 
ering another link in the fraternal chain by which 
we are bound together — let us, who survive him, 
be yet more strongly cemented by the ties of union, 
friendship, and brotherly love ; that, during the 
brief space allotted to us here, we may wisely and 
usefully employ our time, and, in the reciprocal 



^,_ 





rUNEKAL SKRVICE. 




intercourse of kind and friendly acts, mutually pro- 
mote the welfare and happiness of each other. 

Unto the grave we have consigned the body of 
our deceased brother— earth to earth, ashes to ashes, 
dust to dust : — there to remain until the last trump 
shall sound on the resurrection morn. We can 
trustfully leave him in the Jiands of a beneficent 
Being, who has done all things well ; who is glori- 
ous in His holiness, wondrous in His power, and 
boundless in His goodness; and it should only be 
our endeavor so to improve the solemn warning 
now before us that, on the great day of account, we 
too may be found worthy to inherit the Kingdom 
prepared for us from the foundation of the world. 

To the bereaved relatives of him we mourn^ who 
now stand heart-stricken by the heavy hand which 
has thus been laid upon them, we have but little of 
this world's consolation to present. We deeply, 
sincerely, and most affectionately sympathize with 
them in this afflicting dispensation ; and we put up 
our most fervent prayers that " He who tempers 
the wind to the shorn lamb ' ' will look down with 
compassion upon the widow and the fatherless, in 
this their hour of desolation, and will fold the be- 
nevolent arms of His love and protection around 
those who are thus bereft of their earthly stay. 

The Master, or Chaplain, loill then repeat the follow- 
ing prayer: 






rUNEBAIi SEKVICE. 




Almighty and Eternal God, in whom we live, and 
move, and have our being, and before whom all 
men must appear at the Judgment-day to render an 
account of their deeds while in this life — we, who 
are daily exposed to the flying shafts of death, and 
who now surround the grave of one who has fallen 
in our midst, do most humbly beseech Thee to im- 
press deeply on our minds the solemnities of this 
day, and to grant that their remembrance may be 
the means of turning our thoughts from the fleet- 
ing vanities of the present world to the lasting glo- 
ries of the world to come. Let us be continually 
reminded of the frail tenure by which we hold our 
earthly existence; that in the midst of life we are 
in death; and that however upright may have been 
our walk, and however square our conduct, we must 
all submit as victims to the great destroyer, and 
endure the humble level of the tomb. Grant us Thy 
divine assistance, O most merciful God, to redeem 
our mis-spent time; and in the discharge of the im- 
portant duties which thou hast assigned us in the 
erection of our moral edifice, wilt Thou give us 
wisdom to direct us, strength to support us, and the 
beauty of holiness to adorn our labors and render 
them acceptable in Thy sight. And when our work 
on earth is done, and our bodies shall go down to 
mingle with their Idndred dust, may our immortal 
souls, freed from their cumbrous clay, be received 






FUNERAL SERVICE. 




into Thy keeping, to rest forever in that spiritual 
house, not made with hands, eternal in the heavens. 
Amen! 

Response, So mote it be ! 

The Master then approaches the head of the grave 
and says: 

Soft and safe to you, my brother, be this earthy 
bed ! Bright and glorious be thy rising from it! 
Fragrant be the cassia sprig that here shall flourish! 
May the earliest buds of Spring unfold their beau- 
ties o'er this your resting place, and here may the 
sweetness of the Summer's last rose linger longest! 
Though the cold blasts of Autumn may lay them in 
the dust, and for a time destroy the loveliness of 
their existence, yet the destruction is not final, and 
in the Spring they shall surely bloom again. So, 
in the bright morning of the world's resurrection, 
your mortal frame, now laid in the dust by the 
chilling blast of Death, shall spring again into 
newness of life, and expand in immortal beauty, in 
realms beyond the skies. Until then, dear brother, 
until then, farewell! 

(Benediction.) The Lord bless us and keep us — 
the Lord make His face to shine upon us, and be 
gracious unto us — the Lord lift upon us the light of 
His countenance and give us peace. 

Response. Amen! So mote it be. 






r 14 



FUNERAL SEEVICE. 




Thus the services end. The procession will re-form 
and return to the Lodge-Boom ^ and the Lodge will he 
closed in the customary manner, 

7he public Grand Honors of 31asonry are given 
thus: — Cross the arms upon the breast , the left arm 
ouiermostf the hands being open and palms inward ; 
then raise them above the head, the palms of the hands 
striking eachother; and then let them fall sharply upon 
the thighs J the head being bowed. This will be thrice 
done, and, at funerals, the action will be accompanied 
iciih the following ejaculation: — " The will of God is 
accomplished. So mote it be. Amen.*' 




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FUNERAL DIRGE. 



Air — "Pleyel's German Hymn." 

1. Solemn strikes the fun'ral chime, 
Notes of our departing time; 

As we journey here below, 
Through a pilgrimage of woe. 

2. Mortals now indulge a tear, 
For mortality is here ; 

See how wide their trophies wave 
O'er the slumbers of the grave. 

3. Here another Guest we bring ! 
Seraphs of celestial wing, 

To our fun'ral altar come; 
Waft a Friend and Brother home 

4. Far beyond the grave there lie 
Brighter mansions in the sky; 
Where, enthroned, the Deity 
Gives man immortality. 

5. There, enlarged, his soul will see 
What was veiled in mystery; 
Heavenly glories of the place 
Show his Maker *' face to face." 

6. God of life's Eternal Day! 
Guide us, lest from Thee we stray, 
By a false, delusive light, 

To the shades of endless night. 

7. Calm, the Good Man meets his fate ; 
Guards celestial round him wait. 
See, he bursts those mortal chains, 
And o'er Death the vict'ry gains! 

8. Lord of all below, above. 

Fill our souls with truth nnd Love; 
As dissolves our earthly tie, 
Take us to Thy Lodge on High I 

Note. — It is customary to sing only the 1st, 3d and 8th 
stanzas. On funeral occasions the first two of these may be 
sung on entering the burial-ground, while moving in pro- 
cession; and the last during the ceremonies at the grave. 






A CL OSING HYMN. 

Am — * * Home, Sweet Home." 

Farewell, till again we shall welcome the time. 
Which brings us once more to our fame-cherished shrine; 
And tho' from each other we distant may roam. 
Again may all meet in this, our dear love'd home; 

Home, home — sweet, sweet home ; 
May ev'ry dear brother find joy and peace at home. 

And when our last parting on earth shall draw nigh. 
And we shall be called to the Grand Lodge on high. 
May each be prepared when the summons shall come 
To meet the Grand Master in Heaven our home ; 

Home, home— sweet, sweet home; 
May ev'ry dear brother in Heaven find a home. 



ODE FOR THE THIRD DEGREE. 



Air—" Pleyel's German Hymn." 

Ah! when shall we three meet like them 
^V'ho last were at Jerusalem ? 
For three there were, and one is not — 
He lies where Cassia marks the spot, 

Tho' poor he was, with kings he trod; 
Tho* great, he humbly knelt to God. 
Ah! when shall those restore again 
The broken links of Friendship's chain ? 

Behold! where mourning Beauty bent 
In silence o'er his monument 
And wildly spread in sorrow there 
The ringlets of the flowing hair I 

The future sons of grief shall sigh, 
While standing round in Mystic Tie, 
And raise their hands, alas! to Heaven, 
In anguish that no hope is given. 

From whence we came, or whither go. 
Ask me no more, nor seek to know. 
Till three shall meet, who form'd like them. 
The Grand Lodge of Jerusalem. 



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